Fianna Fáil Spokesperson on Disability, Margaret Murphy O’Mahony has said that the announcement from Government today that it intends to finally seek Dáil approval to ratify the UN Convention on the rights of people with disability has the potential to be an important moment for tens of thousands of people living with disabilities in this country.

“Of course, Minister McGrath has in the past made commitments of this nature that never came to fruition. However, I will take the Minister at his word, and will support him and the Government in order to ratify it as quickly as possible.

“Ratification has taken a very long time. I have criticised the Minister for delays many times, but I do want to thank him for bringing this issue through Government.

“Of course, ratification alone will not end the systemic discrimination that people with disabilities face day in, day out in this country.

“Only yesterday, we saw how discrimination was still being ingrained in our public transport system.

“For this development to be meaningful in the longer term and to prompt an end to discrimination, it requires each and every organisation and agency to look at themselves, look at how they treat people with disabilities, and it fundamentally requires the Government to end structural bias in terms of accessing services from the State.

“Ratification is a welcome first step in this important journey towards equality,” concluded Murphy O’Mahony.
Fianna Fáil Spokesperson on Disability, Margaret Murphy O’Mahony has said that the announcement from Government today that it intends to finally seek Dáil approval to ratify the UN Convention on the rights of people with disability has the potential to be an important moment for tens of thousands of people living with disabilities in this country.

“Of course, Minister McGrath has in the past made commitments of this nature that never came to fruition. However, I will take the Minister at his word, and will support him and the Government in order to ratify it as quickly as possible.

“Ratification has taken a very long time. I have criticised the Minister for delays many times, but I do want to thank him for bringing this issue through Government.

“Of course, ratification alone will not end the systemic discrimination that people with disabilities face day in, day out in this country.

“Only yesterday, we saw how discrimination was still being ingrained in our public transport system.

“For this development to be meaningful in the longer term and to prompt an end to discrimination, it requires each and every organisation and agency to look at themselves, look at how they treat people with disabilities, and it fundamentally requires the Government to end structural bias in terms of accessing services from the State.

“Ratification is a welcome first step in this important journey towards equality,” concluded Murphy O’Mahony.