Building Affordable Homes for All

The state has to step up and build affordable units in the right places. This is a core part of Fianna Fail’s vision for securing home ownership for the next generation.

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Every family needs a home

House prices are 90% higher than they were in 2012 while since then Central Bank rules require a 10% deposit and impose 3.5 time income limit. This cocktail of rising house prices, spiralling rent combined with strict Central Bank rules have meant that home ownership levels have slipped to record lows of 67.6% across the country the lowest since 1971, down from a high of 82% in 2004.

The age at which home ownership became the majority tenure category was 35 years in 2016. Prior to that age, more householders were renting rather than owning their home. In comparison to previous censuses dating back to 1991, the ages which marked the changeover between renting and home ownership were 32 years (2011), 28 years (2006), 27 years (2002) and 26 years (1991). Clearly home ownership is moving further and further away for young people.

Reinforcing the CSO data in Ireland, the Resolution Foundation in the UK has found that homeownership rates have slipped most dramatically amongst millennials.

Declining rates of home ownership is the most prominent worry about younger generations, and the changes are indeed large. So far millennial families are half as likely to own their home by the age of 30 as baby boomers were by the same age.

An even bigger reduction in access to social housing means that four-in-ten millennial families at age 30 live in the private rented sector, four times the rate for baby boomers when they were the same age. This rise in private renting means that young adults face greater housing insecurity than previous generations did. They are compromising on quality and convenience too.

Adults aged under 45 have slightly less space than they did two decades ago, whereas over 45s have more. And young adults are commuting longer distances: millennials are on track to spend 64 more hours commuting in the year they turn 40 than baby boomers did at that age.

Fianna Fáil is committed to facilitating and enabling homeownership. A strong affordability scheme is vital to securing that.

Why Do It?

We cannot be solely reliant upon the private sector to provide homes. The state has to step up and build affordable units in the right places. This is a core part of Fianna Fail’s vision for securing home ownership for the next generation.

Fianna Fáil’s plan to help make housing more affordable

  1. A National Redevelopment Agency

    The National Redevelopment Agency will focus on constructing new units on existing state lands which has the capacity to deliver over 42,000 units

  2. Affordable Purchase Scheme

    A new €500m per annum Affordable Purchase Scheme site subsidy. This will provide €50,000 per unit to reduce the price of each home to between €160,000 and €210,000.

  3. Finance local authorities

    Special Purpose Vehicle to provide finance to local authorities for overall investment.

All Issues in Supporting Young Families

Affordable Childcare

Childcare costs are at an all-time high, with the average cost of a fulltime childcare place for a pre-school aged child now at more than €155 per week, far beyond what is affordable for most people in Ireland.

Building Affordable Homes for All

The state has to step up and build affordable units in the right places. This is a core part of Fianna Fail’s vision for securing home ownership for the next generation.

Expand the ECCE Scheme

As a society, investing in early care and education is the most valuable investment we can make.

Primary Focus

We will give reduce class sizes and support primary schools.

Supporting Parental Care

More time spent with your child in their first years benefits everyone.

Join an all-Ireland community of activists.

By joining Fianna Fáil, you too can play a major role in the future of our Party and our country.


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